How to Leave Home Without You

When anxiety is having its way with you, leaving your domicile becomes a daily, dreaded chore. Because I struggled getting to work or school for many years as a victim of panic disorder, I want to help you take on the day so you’ll face only new opportunities instead of new threats.

I’m revisiting this because being able to travel to work or school is vital to your survival and there are so many people who struggle with this daily event – the journey into the unknown. This is for the folks who have to make a living or stay in school and suffer panicky feelings in order to do so.

My recovery program for agoraphobes includes a variety of activities and practices throughout the day designed to help make neural changes in your brain, and over time this work is what will set you free. In the meantime, as you battle anxiety throughout the day, the best advice I can give is to stay in the present moment.  Paying close attention to what you are doing and where you are throughout the journey will enable you to step confidently and serenely into the day.

I advise taking along your journal or notebook and a camera as you begin a new way of leaving home and leaving the anxious you behind.  Be mindful of everything around you and record it as a means of getting out of your head and into a connection with your environment. Peace comes from this if you do it right. As you’re walking feel the surface and make note of what your feet are touching. Describe it in detail. And on and on through your daily journey, take a new view of what you encounter.

Getting into and staying in that frame of mind can be admittedly difficult. But once you fully understand what it means to be in the moment you’ll be able to benefit from the values of meditative, mindful behavior. Here’s an excellent piece by psychologist Dr. John Amodeo on living in the present moment. I hope you’ll read it. I learned from it and I hope you will also. Here’s to healing through learning:

http://psychcentral.com/blog/archives/2015/01/13/what-it-really-means-to-be-in-the-present-moment/

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